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Archive for the ‘Family connections’ Category

Burnside Church

Burnside Presbyterian Church in Clyde River is pleased to invite you to their annual cemetery service on Sunday, July 29th, 7:00 p.m.

Burnside is caretaker of the cemetery that has been in use since 1861, with a new section added in 1962. As the cemetery grows, so does the list of families who are connected to the cemetery.

The cemetery committee has endeavoured to find the names of descendants who have a loved one(s) buried there. Their wish is to include all those people who have a connection to this cemetery to attend their July 29th service.

Having their service at 7:00 p.m. in July allows us to still have sunlight that will make it possible for visitors to visit the grave of their loved one. We are planning an uplifting service of remembrance with special music and a time for refreshments and visiting. There will also be musical accompaniment as visitors enter and leave the church. The service will finish at 8:00 p.m. and visitors are then welcome to the Riverview Community Centre across the road for refreshments.

They welcome you to attend with friends and relatives to remember your loved ones that have gone from your everyday life, but who clearly live on in your memories. While death may be sad, remembrance is not.

Remembrance

We talk openly of life.
Of joyful times we had.
And the joyful times we will have together.
Death gives no joy. It has no voice.
We have muted it because there are no more time to have together.
While the remembrance of death is painful, the remembrance of those who lived,
those we loved, is joyous.
They have left footprints implanted in our minds, in our hearts,
and in the very essence of our being that shall remain forever.
Death is sad. Remembrance is not.
So, let us remember their lives. Forever.

Author, Patrick Cunningham

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In my great grandmother Mary (MacDougall) Darrach’s letters between 1904-1907 to one of her sons and his wife in Boston, I enjoyed her warm sense of humour and the poetic turns of phrase in her writing. I thought I would share some moving and entertaining lines from her letters with you, as they offer a glimpse into family life in Clyde River. Mary and John Darrach had 11 children of which nine lived. At the time of these letters, about half her children had moved to the Boston area. Fan (Frances Darrach Beer) that she refers to in her letters was my grandmother.

  • Well, we are another year nearer home. For sure my time is drawing near if we go by years, but can’t tell who will go first. There is none of us too young. Now our time is passing. It’s good to be ready. This world will keep us busy but when we come to leave, it won’t do much for us, neither will our nearer and dearer friends. Life is short; eternity is long.
  • If you could see the banks of snow. I have never seen anything like it. You would be scared to go on the roads for fear anyone would meet you and go off the track. It is out of sight in some places. As for feed for the cattle, we have plenty.
  • I wish you could see all the valentines the boys and I got from Boston. You never saw such a racket as was over them.
  • Father is about the same, complaining as usual, this wet weather is against him.
  • Uncle Alex is not feeling well, but he has to work till he drops. His money won’t help him much when he’s gone.
  • On Monday, I got three four-leaf clovers…that would be good luck for me to have my children come home.
  • I wish you were all home today and for a few months. You could fish smelts for pocket-money.
  • Poor Fan was in hope the cows won’t go dry, but instead of that, there was three cows calved, churned 16 lbs. of butter today. It makes lots of work but is good to have lots of milk. The hens didn’t lay yet. Fan thinks she’ll stop feeding them and perhaps they will lay better.
  • Uncle Alex is sometimes miserable, takes weak turns. He took a turn the other morning, They thought for sure he was dying. He made awful moans, gasping for breath. She gave him some cold water and he came to. He has no strength. She is the same old stick but I like her, poor thing.
  • We must hope for the best, such is life, ups and downs.
  • The snow was about gone before the snow came, so there is not much sign of spring here now.
  • We had a social in the hall to pay for the church organ last week. It was a poor night, too, but they made 27 dollars.
  • Well, I am back from Eldon. I went Saturday and came back on Tuesday. We had a nice drive. It was the red mare, the best horse there ever was. We could barely hold her back, just as fresh when we came near home as she was when we left Eldon. They are all well. They were awful pleased to see us. I love to see my own.
  • Give my letter to the rest to read, as I have no time to write, as I am hooking.
  • One of my geese had 14 goslings. We are milking 10 cows, three to a calf. The big mare has a lovely mare foal.
  • There is a lot losing their cows. It is hard on some for they are short of feed and no grass yet. (May 30th)
  • Fan is house cleaning upstairs since she got them away, as usual. If you sleep one night up there, she is up the next day with the broom.
  • I couldn’t get an egg what but the hens was lousy. When I would go to gather eggs, I would be full of them, so I took a shovel, broom, and a fork and I cleaned it all out, puts lots of brine and ashes into it, too. Hector helped, as it was raining and gave them all a good bath in sheep dip. It was quite a job.
  • Uncle James is getting blind, can’t butter his own bread.
  • See how sudden Mr. Jones across from us was taken, a woman left with three small children and her not a bit strong, so she has to have strangers do her work. A woman is not much on a farm; however, the Lord is good. He will provide for her.
  • Hector is upstairs getting ready to see the woman, I think Fan expects Fred, for she is dressing up, but poor me, I have my knitting, that’s all for me now.
  • Thank you for the vest you sent to John (her husband). He was so proud, he didn’t know which way to wear it, but he made up his mind it was for Sundays. It was just the thing for him, if he would only wear it every cold day, but he is saving it.
  • Mary is wearing muffs every Sunday, so she is five steps above her dandy.
  • Fan is cleaning ever since she came home. The broom lost 5 lbs. and dust pan 3 lbs. since she came home. I had them both nice and fat but now all gone. Poor father, too, he could walk in before, but now he has to sweep and scrape his feet and then she’d be shouting at him. He says he is as much trouble to her as the flies were.
  • Lizzie got jammed behind the home comfort. They all had to get up from the table to pull her out, had an awful pull to get her out, such speeches you never heard, everyone adding a little.
  • I am very tired tonight, as were hooking all day and it is very tiresome when you have to be up and down. I will be glad when it’s done. We will finish this week, 3 1/2 double weight, lots of hooking on it and it’s for Fan. I hope we have no more visitors this week till we finish hooking.
  • We finished hooking last week. We hooked 11 yards. That was pretty good. I am awful tired, as I am now weaving. I set up the loom and got to it.
  • Aunt Katy and Flo was over to Aunt Maggies and when they were going home, they got in the ice. They got a pretty good dunking. (March)
  • Uncle Alex is quite blind but he comes over to our place, just by guess. We always go to meet him when we see him coming.
  • Referring to an old lady in church, she wrote – Our minister was preaching about Abraham last Sunday and she was asking him when he came out if Abraham was in the pulpit.
  • Upon hearing that her new granddaughter was named Mary after her, she wrote – I am highly honoured to have her named after me. I hope she be spared to you and live to be a good girl, and thank you both for remembering me. I thought it would be a fancy name but is a chosen name as the mother of our savior was named Mary.

Letters are such a wonderful treasure which connect us to those ancestors we would love to sit and have tea with for an afternoon. We’d likely get a job hooking or weaving though.

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Piper plays at summer social

The Clyde River History Committee attended a summer social at the Old Protestant Burying Ground this past Tuesday evening. We were all intrigued to attend our first social at a cemetery, and it turned out to be a wonderful exploration into the early history of Charlottetown and Prince Edward Island as a whole. Many of us never had a chance to visit this site, so we looked forward to their guided tours. The event program follows:

  • Prelude – Piper Brady Singleton, Belfast Pipe and Drum Band Confederation Players
  • Welcome – Chair, Don Patton
  • Remarks – Author George Wright, Who Departed this Life: A History of the Old Protestant Burying Ground
  • Musical Performance – Shirley Wright and players
  • Tree Planting – Reverend Dr. Gordon Matheson
  • Tour of significant sites (including military) and refreshments
  • The invitation was to come and meet your neighbours – Past and Present!

Ann (Grant) Dixon’s headstone – stone came from Nova Scotia and is the same stone used in Province House & Confederation Centre of the Arts. Click on photo to enlarge.

A few days before the event, I received a note from Hilda (Dixon) Colodey that there would be a Clyde River connection at the Old Protestant Burying Ground. Her 2x great-grandmother and my 3x great-grandmother Ann (Grant) Dixon is buried there. Here are the ancestral lines:

Dixon Line:

  • 1st generation: Ann (Grant) married to George A. Dixon
  • 2nd generation: Mackieson Dixon married Amanda Lowther
  • 3rd generation: George Dixon married Margaret MacQuarrie
  • 4th generation: Boyd Dixon married Peggy Easter
  • 5th generation: Hilda, Mack, Alex & Peter

Dixon-Beer Line:

  • 1st generation: Ann (Grant) married to George A. Dixon
  • 2nd generation: Margaret (Dixon), Mackieson’s sister, married Archibald Livingstone
  • 3rd generation: Mary Ann (Livingstone) married James Beer
  • 4th generation: Frederick Beer married Frances Darrach
  • 5th generation: John Beer married Hazel MacLean
  • 6th generation: Blois, Doreen & Vivian

Link to online Ann & George Dixon family tree: www.janedyment.ca

Ann was born in 1799. She travelled to PEI with her husband George A. Dixon in 1832 and purchased Selkirk land on the Bannockburn Road in Clyde River, then known as Dog River. They farmed and operated a mill. Ann died in 1841. Her two daughters, each named Mary Ann (first died in 1830 and second died in 1851), are buried beside her at the Old Protestant Burying Ground.

Hilda tells me that when Ann’s oldest daughter Margaret had her first daughter, she carried on the name Mary Ann.

George A. Dixon remarried Annie Atkinson and they had two more children. George and Annie are buried in the Burnside Presbyterian Cemetery in Clyde River. This cemetery was established in 1856.

A few facts about The Old Protestant Burying Ground:

  • Estimated that about 4000 people were buried here between 1784-1873. A list has been created for 3200.
  • Fell into neglect and suffered bouts of sabotage, but in 1999 a group of citizens came together to restore this important part of Island history.
  • A few of the many notable people buried here:
    • Hon. George Wright, member of legislature – his father Thomas was a surveyor for Samuel Holland.
    • Ambrose Lane, Colonial Administrator, built the stone house in Clyde River. There is also a small waterfall on the property referred to as Lane’s Rock.
    • William Douse, Earl of Selkirk’s land agent that the Dixon’s and Beers would have dealt with when they purchased their original properties. A story about a family reunion and family crypt is featured in this story in Toronto Star.
    • William Crosby – We featured an earlier story, The Crosby’s of Meadowbank, that references William Crosby.
    • Samuel Holman – the first member of the Holman family of merchants.
    • John Frederick Holland – Eldest son of Samuel Holland
    • Online biographies of many interesting people buried here.
    • Online list of all those known to be buried here.

Here is a thoughtful description written by Judy Gaudet of Charlottetown on The Old Protestant Burying Ground:

Imagine a city underground. It is the Charlotte Town that used to be. Here are many prominent people: Ambrose Lane, twice Administrator of the early colony; Hon. George Wright, Surveyor General and five times Administrator of the Colony; Condolly Rankin, High Sherifff; Peter MacGowan, Attorney General; Susan, Governor Ready’s daughter is there; and Jane, Barrister Palmer’s wife. Here are Benjamin Chappell, first postmaster of PEI, and James Coles, whose son George was a Father of Confederation. Plaw the architect, Charles Binns, the attorney. Benjamin Bremmer’s father, JS, the bookseller is here, and his mother, who ran the bookstore when JS died, until she herself was killed in a train accident in Boston.

Here’s bandleader Galbraith’s wife Susan. Here are auctioneers, wheelwrights, soldiers and blacksmiths. Theophilus Desbrisay, the first Anglican Rector, who served for 47 years, is here with his wife, children and grandchildren. Here are the joiners, carriage builders, tinsmiths, teachers and poets. John LePage’s wife and children are here. Here are butchers, bankers, stationers, milkers, masons, saddlers, and harness makers. You might think work could go ahead as usual in the city under the ground. Life and Death.

Here’s Dr. Henry Johnson, the young preacher, just come over from England, liked by everyone, died within weeks of his arrival. Frederick Goodman, Hon. George’s son drowned along with Ann Maloney when their skiff was hit by a sudden squall on their way back from St. Peter’s Island. John Ross, the publisher, lost his young son in the same year as the Charlotte Town fire took his business. Arthur Aggasiz, a young gentleman, had a seizure at the bottom of a well, where he went to retrieve a bucket and drowned despite all the servants could do; Eliza Taylor, wife of Neil Graham, the ship’s carpenter, died in childbirth. His second wife died that way, too.

Many women did. Many children died. But we all have our time. And it may that they are not in this city under the ground at all, “but amidst the stars and near the throne” as one stone claims for a lost Knight child. But should we not pay some honour to this place where they were last seen? Surely if we forget them, and their lives, their contributions and their humanity, the city above ground will be the poorer.

Please make sure to take some time to visit The Old Protestant Burying Ground at 270 University Avenue. Carl Phillis is the caretaker and he is there each week day from 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. He welcomes visitors and loves to answer your questions about the cemetery.

If any of our readers have ancestral connections to those buried at the Old Protestant Burying Ground, we invite you to add information in the comments below.

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This is the eighth excerpt form Meadow Bank W.I. Tweedsmuir History published in 1951. There are multiple family names referenced in this piece. We only highlighted a few in the title.

Click on map to enlarge

On the next farm lived the MacLeods who came out from Scotland about 1830. In this family were three sons: Alexander, Murdock and John and two daughters: Margaret, spinster; and Mrs. Robert MacMillan of Millvale. Since the death of Murdock, the farm has been owned in turn by Will Henderson, Cecil Scott, Wilfred MacLeod, Mr. Kennedy and now (1951) by John Miller who in 1928 emigrated with his wife and family of seven boys from West Calder, Scotland.

Of the farm that Norman MacFadyen now owns the first we know is that a Captain MacDonald owned it in 1840. (Captain Gore’s deed to Andrew Cody of farm to the west) then Duncan Patterson. His two sons, Duncan and Charles lived here, the former operated the farm while the latter had a blacksmith forge on the roadside. Wallace Patterson is a grandson of Duncan Senior and is now a jeweller in Charlottetown (1951). The Pattersons sold to Bob MacMillan who later sold to Neil Ferguson from when the present owner bought.

Continuing west we find that in 1840 one Captain Gore sold to Andrew Coady 100 acres for £116, 13d. He was married to Rosie McAtter, their three children were Mary Ann, Ellen and Andrew II. It was sold to Robert Boyle May 4th, 1896. In August 23rd, it was deeded to George H. Boyle, son of Robert. The farm is now owned by Gordon Boyle.

On the South side of the road some distance West of what is now called Boyle’s Creek, on a small corner of the Coady farm, lived Matthew Boylan, labourer, and his wife Mary McAtter, sister of the aforesaid Mrs. Coady. Their two sons were Patrick and Terrance, the former was a plasterer in Charlottetown, the latter moved to the Western part of the Island.

William Boyle & Ellen Farquharson

The next farm originally Capt. Gore’s Property was owned by John Boyle who for a time lived with his family at Cornwall on or near the farm now (1951) owned by Leigh Good. In John Boyle’s family were Michael and William and two daughters, Mrs. Angus MacEachern and Mrs. James MacLean. William moved to Charlottetown and operated a tannery on Spring Park Road. Michael continued to live on the old farm where he married Miss Margaret Boyle To this union were born four sons and five daughters. One son, the late William was the subsequent owner until his death in 1928 when the property was purchased by Fred Hyde of the adjoining farm for his son Stanley, the present owner.

“Edgewood”, the farm of Elmer Hyde consists of 125 acres and was purchased from George MacEachern, son of Angus, by Henry Hyde and willed to his son Frederick in 1896. The Hydes had to clear the land where the buildings now stand, the only building on the place at the time of their occupancy being the former Meadow Bank school house and now used as a workshop.

The remaining 75 acres of the MacEachern farm which contained the MacEachern dwellings was later sold to Frank Boyle, the present owner.

The Atlas of 1880 shows James MacLean to be in possession of the next 200 acres but this was soon after divided and Hammond Crosby bought the half next to the road and occupied it until his death in 1919 when it was bought by James MacPhail. It is now owned and occupied by his son Colin D. MacPhail (1951).

The remaining part of the original MacLean home has continued in the name passing from father to son. It is now in possession of Frank MacLean.

Of the adjoining farm, Mrs. Victor MacPhail writes,

“The first trace we have of our farm is that it was leased by the trustees of the Rt. Hon. Thomas Earl of Selkirk to one John Calladow in May 1825. This lease was assigned by John Calladow in August 1827 to Donald MacNeill. Donald MacNeill died in February 1848. He willed the lease to his wife Margaret and his two sons, Ewen and Neil. The MacNeills sold to Alexander MacLeod for the same of £250 in the year 1856. The holders of a lease had to pay rent and perform certain covenants. There is no mention of Alexander MacLeod. The next deed we have is one where James MacMillan paid the sum of $195.04 to the Commissioner of Public Lands for the said 84 acres in the year 1893. In March 1900, James MacMillan sold to Edwin Jones. Edwin Jones died and his widow sold to James MacPhail in 1908. The farm must have been resurveyed at this time for here it is listed as 80 4/5 acres. James MacPhail sold 10 acres of this to Frank Boyle. In 1936, Victor MacPhail (son) bought the remaining 70 4/5 acres. The first house was down near the shore.”

 

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This is the seventh excerpt form Meadow Bank W.I. Tweedsmuir History published in 1951.

Meadow Bank Map

Click on map to enlarge

Thomas Hyde, head of the Hyde Family, came from County Clare, Ireland in 1770 where he followed the trade of spinning and weaving, having emigrated with his parents from England some years previous. He purchased his land for the sum of £109 11s 9d. The first deed from Gov. Patterson is dated April 4th, 1786. Until this time, quit-rents were supposed to have been paid. Thomas Hyde brought with him a family of two sons and five daughters and left one daughter married in Ireland. The sons’ names were William and Thomas.

William was a captain in the militia and on two occasions served as an M.P.P. He was married to a Miss Simpson of Cavendish. To there were born a family of four sons and six daughters. The sons were William, James, Thomas and John. The daughters were Mrs. Cameron of Covehead; Mrs. Stewart of DeSable; Mrs. Todd of Arcola, Illinois; and Elinar, Jannet and Sara who were unmarried. We know that William Junior first lived on the farm now owned by Russell Hyde Senior and that during the time of his father William Hyde Senior a two-storied eight-sided house was built which contained a ballroom on the second floor. This house was the social centre at which members of parliament were often entertained. When still young, William Junior moved to the eastern half of the Hyde property later know as the “Point Farm” owned by his son Henry and grandson Harry M. until the last mentioned sold to the Alex H. MacKinnons in 1945.

Henry Hyde & his wife Isabel Adams

William Junior married Mary Braddock and to this union were born six sons: Samuel, Lemuel, William, Henry, Charles and Albert and two daughters who afterwards became Mrs. James Farquharson and Mrs. David MacEwen. Thomas Hyde moved to US, James married Bell Nelson and moved to Pictou County, N.S., John owned the mill where Harry Crosby now lives. He married a Miss MacEwen and their family consisted of seven daughters and four sons. The sons were Artemus Hyde of Clyde River, William of Halifax, Duncan who lived on the home place and John killed by accident.

Mrs. Duncan Patterson of Charlottetown and her son Wallace, the jeweller, are direct descendants of Thomas Hyde, son of the immigrant.

Here I wish again to refer to the eight-sided house which was burned, supposedly about the year 1857 at a time when two Hyde women, spinsters, were the only persons living in it. Two valuable articles of furniture saved from the flames were a sixteen-legged table made of black birch and a grandfather clock both considerable over one hundred years old. Included in the loss were several valuable papers the destruction of which severed a connecting link with relatives in the Old Land.

Sometime before 1786, one John Wilson lived on the land west of the Crosbys for we find that he bought out his land from Gov. Patterson in that year. He later sold to Williams and Webster who in the year 1852 sold to John Drake who came here from Pownal with his wife Susan Burhow of that place. They had a family of eight sons and one daughter most of whom settled here, Samuel and James H. occupying the home place which had undergone border changes, 50 acres having been sold to the Crosbys on the East and an additional 50 acres having been obtained to the West. Both brothers now owned 100 acres. These farms are now owned by Richard, son of Samuel and Lemuel H., son of James.

James Yeo lives on the farm formerly owned by Thomas Hyde (son of immigrant) and his descendants William and Joseph who in turn occupied it until 1901 when it was bought by Herbert Howard. The present owner is a veteran of World War II whose wife Dorothy Agnew came from County Monaghan, Ireland.

The next farm, as far as we know was first owned by John Small MacDonald, brother of the late Governor A.A. MacDonald. John MacDonald sold to a Mr. Cooper who later sold to the Hydes (Samuel Hyde). It was in turn sold to John Scott of Scott’s Mills for his two sons, Seymour and Peter each getting 100 acres. The former sold to Ivan Clow while the family of the latter still lives on the western half.

Editor’s Note:

Hyde & Crosby Pioneer Cemetery, click here.

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Many families in Clyde River have an ancestral connection to Colonsay, Scotland. Immigrants to Prince Edward Island in the early 1800s sailed on the Polly 1803, Dykes 1803, Oughton 1803, Spencer 1806 and settled in Belfast, Clyde River and surrounding areas, becoming part of the Selkirk Settlers. Common family names are Darrach, MacLean, MacNeil, Bell, Currie, MacPhee, MacEachern, to name a few. Here is drone footage of Colonsay. Enjoy. If you have visited here, share your experience in the comments.

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The Friends of Clyde River Historical Committee received a donation to our archives of a small trunk/sea chest with the initials H.S.B. on its lid in brass nail heads. This trunk belonged to Barbara Stewart’s great-grandmother, Helen Stewart Birnie Stewart. It probably accompanied her in 1846 when she travelled to the Island with her husband Robert Bruce Stewart and their young children. Barbara wrote the following article to provide some background. 

My great-grandmother, Helen Stewart Birnie Stewart was born in London, England, April 20, 1815 (died 1871).

Her father, George Birnie, was born in London in 1785, the son of Alexander Birnie and Anne Bayley. Alexander Birnie and his brother James were born in Aberdeen, Scotland. In London, they became ship owners and captains of whaling ships, operating in the South Pacific. James Birnie settled eventually in Australia.

George Birnie emigrated to PEI in 1809. In Charlottetown he met and married (27.12.1810) Magdalene (“Lany”) Stewart, the daughter of Captain John Stewart. Their home was at 26 Great George Street, Charlottetown. With their first three children, they returned to London in 1813. Helen and the last two children were born in London. The Birnie family firm became bankrupt in 1838, and George Birnie returned soon after to PEI.

The Birnie children remained in London with their mother. Son George Jr. emigrated to Australia where his uncle and family were established. In London, daughter Matilda married William Johnston and they, too, settled in Australia, as did the remaining Birnie daughter, Elizabeth.

screen-shot-2017-02-05-at-12-23-49-pm

Strathgartney Homestead, home of Helen and Robert Bruce Stewart in Bonshaw

In London, June 27, 1838, Helen married Robert Bruce Stewart. His father, David, and uncle Robert, natives of Scotland then living in London, were acquiring land on the colony of PEI. In 1846, with their five children Helen and Robert set out for PEI to settle on the property the Stewarts then owned here.

That same year, Magdalene Birnie returned to the Island to join husband George. They died here – George 30.10.1863, and Magdalene, 21.08.1865. Both are buried in the Old Protestant Burying Ground – photo of George Birnie grave here and photo of Magdalene’s grave here.

Helen and Robert Bruce Stewart had eleven children, eight of whom lived to adulthood. Helen died August 19, 1871. She was buried in the family cemetery at Strathgartney which her husband established upon her death. From then until 1931, several family members were buried there. The last was my grandmother, Anne Warburton Stewart, who died September 5, 1931.

IMG_7806The family cemetery is located in a grove of trees just in behind the Communication Tower and several meters in from the new route of the Trans Canada Highway. The cemetery is maintained by the parish of St. John Evangelist Anglican Church of Crapaud. A path leading to the cemetery is accessible from the communication tower site.

My grandfather, Robert Bruce Stewart Jr., was the oldest son of Helen Birnie and Robert Bruce Stewart. My father, Walter Fitz-Alan Stewart, was the second of Robert Jr.’s sons.

The small trunk/sea chest, with the  initials H.S.B. on its lid in brass nail heads, belonged to my great-grandmother, Helen Stewart Birnie Stewart. It probably accompanied her in 1846 when she travelled to the Island with her husband and their young  children.

In July 2016, her trunk was given by my family to the History Committee of the Friends of Clyde River for their museum.

Barbara Stewart
Montreal, January 30, 2017

Thank you to the Stewart family for this donation which represents an important part of the history of Prince Edward Island.

Editor’s notes:

  • Island Magazine feature: Robert Bruce Stewart and the Land Question 
  • Link to Strathgartney Cemetery – Canada Historic Places here.
  • Public archives letters (George and Alexander Birnie), more info here.
  • Mount Stewart is named after Captain John Stewart.
  • Walter Fitz-Alan Stewart was a farmer, fox rancher and Liberal MLA, more info here.

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