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Archive for the ‘Friends of Clyde River’ Category

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Katherine Dewar

Saturday, February 4th – 1:30-3:30 p.m. – Author of Those Splendid Girls  “The Heroic Service of Island Nurses in the Great War”

In Those Splendid Girls, author Katherine Dewar combines her love of history and knowledge of nursing to redreScreen Shot 2017-01-02 at 10.24.28 PM.pngss a 100-year-old wrong: the absence in the historical narratives of both Prince Edward Island and of Canada, of nurses’ experiences in the real War. Told through the stories of Island nurses, their experiences of mud, blood and courage reflect those of women from all provinces who served amid the horrors of WW I. Dewar identifies at least 115 Island women who answered the call to war, many of whose names have not been known until now. Granted rare access to private diaries and fragile photo albums tucked away in dusty attics, she pieces together their stories of hospitals, bombings, fear and friendships to provide this powerful new account of the war. Katherine has received several heritage awards for research and writing, most recently The PEI Museum and Heritage Award of Honour, given for an outstanding contribution to the heritage of P.E.I. over a long period of time. More info at thosesplendidgirls.ca  Books will be available for purchase ($27.95).

The lecture takes place at the Riverview Community Centre, 718 Clyde River Road. All are welcome. Refreshments will be served. We welcome our audience to also take the time to visit our large collection of archives and heritage photos at the community centre.

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Our 5th Annual Clyde River Lecture Series is back after attracting record audiences in 2016. The series has become the place to be on Saturday afternoons during an Island winter, where you can enjoy entertaining stories from the past along with warm hospitality and refreshments. All are welcome to attend. We invite you to take along any memorabilia or photos related to the topics. Tables will be set out to display your items. The lectures take place at the Riverview Community Centre on Clyde River Road.

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Photo credit: The Guardian

Saturday, January 21st, 1:30-3:30 p.m. – Carol MacLellan – “The Attraction of Old Home Week” – depicting 125 years of the Provincial Exhibition

Everyone who grew up in PEI has great stories about Old Home Week. Carol says she had enough stories and photos for many books. This rich history covers an important part of Island culture where rural and city folks have come together since 1888 to celebrate at an agricultural fair in Charlottetown. Carol will introduce how the book came about as well as discuss the involvement of the Old Home Week Board and History Committee. She will talk about the interviews, research and how they organized and designed it to make sure they covered the many wonderful aspects of the exhibition. Books will be available for purchase at the event ($20).

Carol MacLellan is a retired teacher having taught all grades from 1-12, starting in a one room school to teaching English in High School.  She was Allied Youth Advisor to her students for 20 years and 4-H Leader including Overall Leader for 16 years with the Pleasant Valley 4-H Club. After retirement, she served for 14 years on the Provincial Board of Women’s Institute, the last three representing the National Board of the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada. While she was Chair of the Women’s Institute handcrafts and Arts Show at the Provincial Exhibition, she was asked to become involved in writing the history of Old Home Week. “The Attraction of Old Home Week on Prince Edward Island,” depicting 125 years of the Provincial Exhibition.

Screen Shot 2017-01-02 at 10.20.09 PM.pngSaturday, February 4th – 1:30-3:30 p.m. – Author of Those Splendid Girls  “The Heroic Service of Island Nurses in the Great War”

In Those Splendid Girls, author Katherine Dewar combines her love of history and knowledge of nursing to redreScreen Shot 2017-01-02 at 10.24.28 PM.pngss a 100-year-old wrong: the absence in the historical narratives of both Prince Edward Island and of Canada, of nurses’ experiences in the real War. Told through the stories of Island nurses, their experiences of mud, blood and courage reflect those of women from all provinces who served amid the horrors of WW I. Dewar identifies at least 115 Island women who answered the call to war, many of whose names have not been known until now. Granted rare access to private diaries and fragile photo albums tucked away in dusty attics, she pieces together their stories of hospitals, bombings, fear and friendships to provide this powerful new account of the war. Katherine has received several heritage awards for research and writing, most recently The PEI Museum and Heritage Award of Honour, given for an outstanding contribution to the heritage of P.E.I. over a long period of time. More info at thosesplendidgirls.ca  Books will be available for purchase ($27.95).

Screen Shot 2017-01-02 at 10.27.33 PM.pngSaturday, February 18th, 1:30-3:30 p.m. – Alan Buchanan, Storyteller – “Home from Boston: Stories of Island Family Connections in the New England States”

Many Islanders, especially from large families, went to the Boston area in the early part of the 1900s to find work, but they would always return in summers to visit their Island siblings and cousins and enjoy their ancestral Island home. This will be an opportunity to hear Alan’s entertaining stories but also to share your own. For those Boston area cousins that follow us here on our website, we welcome you to email us your stories as well in advance of the event and we will make sure to share them.

Alan Buchanan was born and raised in Belfast, Prince Edward Island. He has had a varied career, but lately has become best known as a storyteller. His career on-stage began with the production, Belfast People, in the 1980’s. Since then, he has been a member of the award-winning group, Hedgerow, and has also been featured on local, regional, and national radio broadcasts, including the popular CBC comedy show “Madly Off in all Directions”. Several summers ago, he was a member of the cast of Story which played to sold-out audiences at the Guild in Charlottetown, and for the past two summers he has been a part of the fabulously popular Four Tellers at the King’s Playhouse in Georgetown. His hilarious stories centre on the colourful characters and cultural quirks he observed growing up in a rural community.

Following the lectures, refreshments will be served. We welcome our audience to also take the time to visit our large collection of archives and heritage photos at the community centre. If you have any questions about the lectures, please contact Vivian at vivian@eastlink.ca.

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IMG_2760.JPGI travelled out from the city to the Strawberry Social last evening hosted by the Clyde River Women’s Institute. They had a great crowd. As folks arrive, you get a little sticker with a number which is called when seats are available. Alex Dixon says he comes at the same time each year, and this year he had a higher number, deducing there were more overall. I had a chance to sit with J’Nan and Kirk Brown to catch up on their news. They are celebrating their wedding anniversary this summer and still smiling brightly. As usual, they are expecting summer visitors. Not surprising, they live in heaven down by the river.

Sandra Cameron hosted history enthusiasts in the Emily Bryant Room during the event and she had lots of visitors. There are so many things to see. Each treasure tells a story, rather, generations of stories. I recounted one story to some visitors about the small salt dish with a pink hue on the second shelf of the display case which could easily be overlooked. The dish was Lee Darrach’s, the Lee that fought in both WW1 and WW2. He was in the Halifax Infirmary during the time of the Halifax explosion. The explosion catapulted the salt dish onto his hospital bed. He saved it as a testament to having survived once again. He passed it on to his brother Hector which was then given to his grandson and he gave it us. It sits on the same shelf as Lee’s photo in uniform and the two Christmas cards and many letters he sent to his family during the war. These were donated to us from his other grand nephew in Florida. As part of the Capturing Memories project when we invited donations of artifacts, I stopped being surprised by synchronicity. These historical items were coming home along with their stories. This is a memory room, and when we linger by each humble piece, we can remember the people who came before.

J’Nan invited me to drop down to her farm to get a dozen blue eggs from her Ameraucana hens after the social. She and Sidney Poritz who owns the adjoining property debate which of them has the more beautiful land. I am happy to stand on her front yard looking across their fields to the rivers. It’s where the West River and Clyde River meet. Sidney lives on the homestead of my great grandparents. That is where Lee Darrach was raised. I have the letters his mother wrote to her boys between 1904-07 talking about daily life. This was all Darrach property at one time. J’Nan recalls Mrs. MacNeill who lived here before she and Kirk purchased the farm. Mrs. MacNeill told her “the view sustained me”.

As I drove out the long lane from J’Nan and Kirk’s, I was struck by the sunset over Dunedin. The synchronicity of this moment was not lost. I stopped, took a few shots and emailed my favourite to J’Nan with a subject line “Sunset in Heaven”.

Editor’s note: Earlier stories were written on the Brown’s (This Old Barn has some Stories to Tell) and Poritz (Darrach-Poritz Homestead) properties.

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The Friends of Clyde River invites everyone to our annual Art in the Park event on Saturday, July 16, from 8:30 a.m. until noon at Murchison Place Park. Guest artist Julia Purcell will lead an art demonstration. All are welcome to take along their art supplies to paint/sketch or, if you just want to relax and listen, that is great as well. We offer a special invitation to families to come out and paint together.

Take this opportunity to stroll through the park to see the many recent improvements that have been made which include new play and swing sets, areas landscaped and new trees added.

Art in the Park will take place in fair weather or light rain. Please check this website for details if the weather is uncertain.

Murchison Park is located on the corner of the TransCanada Hwy and the Clyde River Rd. Coffee and treats will be provided in the early morning but feel free to take along a lunch.

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Ronnie MacKinley will join us in Clyde River next Saturday, February 20th at 1:30 p.m. to talk about the days when all the communities in the area went head to head in the game of hockey. All are welcome, and we extend a special invitation to those who played on the teams in the 1950s and 60s to join us. Make sure to take along any memorabilia you have to display for this occasion. We are bringing in extra chairs, as we know it will be popular. However, you may find yourself falling off your chair laughing when natural storyteller Ronnie gets wound up.

I found a feature on the Island Narratives site that talks about the interesting history and community spirit that saw the North River Rink constructed in 1949, opened in 1950 and serving the area for many years, link here.

See you next week at the Riverview Community Centre in Clyde River. Refreshments will be served.

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What struck me most by Verna Clow’s presentation is the great fondness that the audience of almost 100 had for Verna and her family’s country store, many of whom were customers or staff of this family business that is into its 77th year. Others were recalling the community stores that they grew up with. As much as Costco, Walmart, Sobeys and Superstore promote their level of customer service, they could not come close to the responsiveness and devotion that Clow’s store has provided its clientele over the years.

It’s clear to see why this store has survived along with the few other country stores we are lucky to find in communities. It’s an abundance of commitment. It’s long, long hours of hard work, flexibility to change with the times and a decent amount of good fortune. Of course, it helps when the next generation is keen to take over, and with that comes new and modern ideas. The generations of Clow children were raised in the store and given responsibility. They were made to feel vital to the store’s success. As much, the older generation knew when to stand back and when to offer support as the kids took the reins.

I am still smiling about the time when Bobby expanded the store, he found out he had encroached on the neighbour’s property, but as these matters are settled in the country, the Clow’s just gave their neighbour a piece of land off another boundary and instructed the lawyers to revise their deeds.

It’s not difficult to tell that Bobby married well. Verna said that they were 20 and 21 years of age when they got married and started their life off together working in the store. She’s seen a lot of changes. They went from not having to worry about such things as taxes and regulations. She says it is so much more complicated now, and administration has become a huge task. She recalls Bobby’s father just pulling the receipts out of the chest pocket of his overalls at the end of the week to review the week’s sales with his wife when they were still managing the store.

Verna says she still goes in a few days a week, as habits are hard to break. But there is another reason. It is what I saw on the faces of the folks in the room. These people, their parents, their kids – they grew up with the Clow family. It’s a precious memory and bond from their youth that still exists. It’s that level of customer service that you could never learn in business school.

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Leonard Cusack’s presentation was excellent yesterday and we had our highest turnout yet at 70 people, including folks with ancestral connections to staff or patients at the sanatorium in Emyvale. Leonard did a thorough job of capturing this important and all but forgotten time in our history in the book, A Magnificent Gift Declined: The Dalton Sanatorium of Prince Edward Island, available at the UPEI Bookstore.

So many young lives were cut short with TB in the early part of the last century and, in some cases, parents lost many of their children. To honour their brief lives, I thought we could gather some names of those from Clyde River and neighbouring communities on our website as a memorial.

Please send information to vivian@eastlink.ca. Include their names, parent’s or spouse’s name, the year of their death and their age or as much of this information as you have. We also welcome you to send photos and add any memories or stories you know of them. Please check back to this page as we build our memorial.

Amy and Albert Mayhew-Amy Ann Beer Mayhew, died 1904, age 29, daughter of James and Mary Ann (Livingstone) Beer, and her husband Alfred Edward Mayhew, died 1900, age 29. They were married in 1895. (picture featured)

“…He was patiently and tenderly nursed by his wife. Three years later her own health began to fall and it soon became apparent that the disease which has claimed her husband had fastened itself upon her, also.” (newspaper clipping)

-Angus and Jane Darrach lost seven children to Tuberculosis: Hector (age 19 1862), Sarah (age 30 1865), Mary (age 22 1866), Jane (age 19 1866), Angus (age 19 1866), Archibald (age 19 1870) and Duncan (age 26 1875). Buried St. Catherine’s Pioneer Cemetery

-In letters of Mary Ann MacDougall Darrach, she mentions in a March 17, 1905 letter the death of Mabel Cruwys from Kingston who lived in Boston and was only married 6 months to John Edwards before she died of consumption. Buried Kingston Cemetery.

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