Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘History’ Category

The following is the story of HMCS Prince Henry and its WWII Adventure off Callao, Peru. It is also my father’s story. Dad served in the Royal Canadian Navy on Prince Henry for this operation and the photos he captured offer us a first-hand account of the events that took place off Callao. We incorporated some of these photos within the story and the full gallery is featured at the end. I am publishing this article to honour my father on the 100th anniversary of his birth, March 21st, 2017.

Prince Henry retrofitted in Sorel, Quebec – followed an icebreaker to make its way up St. Lawrence River to Halifax, December 1940

Prince Henry was a member of a fleet of warships known as “The Princes”. The other ships were Prince David and Prince Robert. The Princes were originally designed as small luxury liners to compete with CPR’s Princess ships on the West Coast, but when the Depression hit, they were not earning their keep. The Royal Canadian Navy acquired and retrofitted them to become arms merchant cruisers. Prince Henry was overhauled in Sorel, Quebec, and commissioned on December 4th, 1940.

John Beer and fellow seaman in Bermuda – February 1941

Prince Henry left Halifax on January 12th, 1941 for Bermuda. A stormy three-day passage introduced the crew to the ship’s quick rolling action and forced them to find their sea legs in a hurry. They arrived in Hamilton, Bermuda, for five intensive weeks of workups, exercises designed to prepare the crew for any possible emergency. Training included gunnery practices, a challenge due to Prince Henry‘s rolling tendency, making it increasingly difficult to hit targets in rough seas.

After receiving orders to support forces on the Eastern Pacific, Prince Henry left Bermuda on February 19th, arrived in Kingston, Jamaica, four days later. They replenished supplies, completed more training exercises and proceeded through the Panama Canal on February 26th.

The Allies were keen to protect the coveted Panama Canal territory from the Axis powers of Germany, Italy, Japan, Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria, hence their interest in moving Latin America away from its Axis ties. Peru, in a long dispute with Columbia over territory between Peru and Ecuador, saw the war as an opportunity to use their military forces to occupy the disputed region. The United States, which was gearing up for entry into the war, wanted an end to further conflicts in Latin America by forming alliances with new President Manuel Prado Ugarteche and the Peruvian Navy. Peru was the first country to be persuaded to break away from the Axis powers and create a firm alliance with Allies, specifically the US.

British Cruiser Diomede stationed off Callao, Peru, needed assistance to disrupt German merchant ships from leaving the port at Callao. Four German merchant ships, stranded there for over a year, were closely watched by Peruvian and Allied vessels. German seamen were desperate to return home. Japan was Germany’s Ally in the Pacific, so their most likely destination.

Peruvian General visiting Prince Henry while in port at Callao

Visiting Peruvian General onboard Prince Henry while in port at Callao, March 24, 1941

Prince Henry arrived in Callao on March 1st. On March 16th, Diomede was called away, so Prince Henry took over. For awhile they anchored close by the German ships in the Callao port while arranging courtesy calls with Peruvian officials. This opportunity gave them a chance to take a closer look. The German ships were fully fueled and recently wired to fire and destroy themselves in the event of being captured. The Germans didn’t want their large cargoes to fall into Peruvian hands.

German ships (München, Leipzig, Monserrate and Hermonthis) waiting for their escape off Callao, Peru, March 24, 1941.

After leaving port and waiting and watching a few miles offshore, Captain R.I. Agnew of Prince Henry decided to move out to sea to make the German captains believe they had given up. Ten days later, at 1915, on March 31st, Prince Henry‘s Captain received a message that the Hermonthis and München had requested permission to leave Callao port. Prince Henry was 70 miles south of Callao. It would take Prince Henry three hours at full speed to get back. The knew the German ships were slower, so the Canadian crew determined their exact course and speed to intercept them.

HMCS Prince Henry intercepts two German ships:

After eight hours, Prince Henry discovered München north of Callao within 15 miles. The crew of the München sighted Prince Henry and altered their course northward and then to the west. Prince Henry went in pursuit. At 0700 on April 1st, a critical strategic maneuver orchestrated by Prince Henry’s Captain Agnew moved them within 6 miles of the German ship. They flashed the international signal, “Stop instantly or I will open fire.” München ignored the warning. Prince Henry fired a warning shot. The Germans scuttled the München. Within moments, the ship was in a cloud of smoke and the crew could be seen lowering the life boats. By the time Prince Henry reached the ship, it was in flames and not salvageable.

German ship sighted, but it was already scuttled

German ship sighted, but it was already scuttled

With the German crew safe in their small boats and heading towards Peru, Prince Henry proceeded full speed southward in search of the other ship, Hermonthis. Four hours later, they saw German ship on the horizon to the southeast. The ship was already on fire and the crew was lowering boats to escape. Prince Henry drew alongside and lowered her cutter to round up one of the German boats.

It looked as though the ship could be saved. They ordered the Germans back on the ship to fight the blaze. Prince Henry secured herself to the side of the German ship. The Canadian crew attempted to extinguish the fire. The heat was intense.

After four hours, they succumbed to the realization that they were losing the battle. The sea was rough. The ships were smashing and grinding against each other and the hoses were breaking. Hermonthis could not be saved. The Prince Henry along with the first group of German prisoners went in search of the Germans in the other two life boats.

After the remaining German crew were brought onboard Prince Henry, they shot gunfire at the Hermonthis to sink her. They returned to the site of München to destroy her, but it had already been destroyed by a Peruvian cruiser that had also recovered the German crew.

German prisoner

German prisoner

In retaliation for the Germans scuttling their ships, the Peruvian government seized two Deutsche Lufthansa planes and property, an airline 100% German owned and operating in Peru. Consequently, Pan-American Grace Airlines (Panagra), which was closely collaborating with the US, increased flight services within Peru, driving out German air operations.

Intercepting two German ships in the Callao operation was considered Prince Henry‘s outstanding achievement. Their success was attributed not to luck but to solid strategy and the ability and skill to carry it out.

Return to British Columbia

Prince Henry patrolled for three more weeks off Peru before heading to Esquimalt, B.C. on April 29th to transfer her prisoners and replenish supplies. She was to join up with Prince David on duty but that ship was due for a retrofit. In September, 1941, Prince Henry was assigned duty of depot ship for Newfoundland Escort Force.

Back in PEI

John was back in PEI to spend Christmas with his family and girlfriend Hazel MacLean before beginning his assignment to Newfoundland. The year 1941 was an eventful one within the Pacific theatre of war for a farm boy from Bannockburn Road.

John Beer’s photo collection: Click on photos to enlarge and proceed through gallery. John’s service record and editor’s notes follow below gallery.

John Eugene Beer, R.C.N.V.R. – V1340, Able Seaman, service record:

  • John enlisted with the Royal Canadian Navy in August 1940 at the Queen Charlotte Armouries in Charlottetown.
  • Three days after enlisting he was sent to HMCS Stadacona Naval Base in Halifax for basic training.
  • Drafted to Montreal to pick up the HMCS Prince Henry destined for the Pacific Ocean by way of the Panama Canal. Her mission was to capture German ships off the coast of Callao, Peru.
  • Drafted to HMCS Naden, Esquimalt, British Columbia and then to HMCS Stadacona, Halifax. He was drafted to Greenock, Scotland, crossing the Atlantic on the Queen Elizabeth I which transported over 15,000 troops per trip. He was stationed in Newcastle, England, where he participated in gunnery classes.
  • Drafted to the Tribal Class destroyer HMCS Athabaskan on loan to the Royal Navy. For several months, he served on the Athabaskan, working out of Scapa Flow in the North Sea. This vessel was on striking force naval duties around Iceland, Norway and the Bay of Biscay.
  • Left the Athabaskan in Plymouth, England, returning to HMCS Niobe, a naval base in Greenock, Scotland. On a later trip to sea, the HMCS Athabaskan was torpedoed and sunk in the Bay of Biscay where 128 sailors perished, and 85 were taken prisoner of war.
  • While in Scotland, John was drafted to the destroyer HMCS Qu’Appelle on convoy duties to Newfoundland. He was drafted off this ship at St. John’s, Newfoundland, for gate vessel duties and shore patrol. He was then drafted for further gate vessel duty to Prince Rupert, British Columbia.
  • John received his discharge in October 1945 while in Esquimalt, British Columbia. He returned to Clyde River, Prince Edward Island, to his family and childhood sweetheart, Hazel MacLean. There were married on November 14th, 1945. He had purchased her diamond ring in St. John’s.

Editor’s notes:

There were four German ships in total at the port in Callao, Peru. Prince Henry intercepted München (location of capture here) and Hermonthis (location of capture here). A Peruvian warship prevented Leipzig and Monserrate from leaving port and they also scuttled their own ships.

Prince Henry stats: Pendant – F70; Armed Merchant Cruiser, Displacement – 5736 tonnes; length – 385 ft.; width – 57 ft; draught – 21 ft.; speed – 22 kts; compliment – 31 officers and 386 crew; arms – 4-4″ gns. (2×11), 2-2 pars, 8-20mm.

Materials referenced:

Photos: John Beer’s photos should not be copied without permission – please contact Vivian Beer – vivian@eastlink.ca

Read Full Post »

This is the ninth excerpt from the Meadow Bank W.I. Tweedmuir History that was published in 1951.

MacLean Homestead

Charles MacLean came here from Aberdeen, Scotland, where he was a shepherd. The exact date of his arrival on Prince Edward Island is not known. We are told that as a young man he cut cord wood where the city scales now stand in Charlottetown and also wooed Catherine MacKinnon of Highfield to be his bride. To this union was born four daughters: Catherine, Sallie, Mary and Ann and two sons: Duncan and Allan.

The MacLeans property of 60 acres was purchased from the executors of the estate of late Lord Selkirk of London, England, by the Douses who sold to Mr. MacLean in 1850. £40 of the £300 purchase price being required as a down payment. Deeds show that the Clyde River which formed the western boundary of the MacLean farm was called Dog River and the cove, Potter’s Cove, because of a brick kiln which was there at one time.

Here I wish to record one instance of the endurance and fortitude of the women of pioneer days. Being in need of grain for seed and not able to go himself because of a recent illness, Mr. MacLean’s wife, Catherine, leaving a three-month baby at home, went along in a rowboat to Belfast, making the return trip in three days and bring with her a bag of wheat.

Charles MacLean and Emmerson

Charles, son of Allan, who inherited the property in 1862 had two wives, his first Catherine Duff, who children were Sara and John Duff; his second, Eliza Brown, to whom was born Charles, Ophelia, Emmerson, and Fred. It is said that Allan had the first cart in that part of Meadow Bank as there was no road other than a foot path he had to bring it around the shore from Clyde River Bridge.

In 1901, Allan’s son Charles acquired the property. He married Edith Fraser and to them were born Elmer, Gordon, Allan, Hazel, Winnie, Jean, Donald (Dan), Kathleen and Ida.

Since 1919, the original MacLean farm has been in possession of Gordon (the second son).

We are told by Mrs. Gordon MacLean (nee Grace MacKinnon) that her grand-uncle John L. MacKinnon, founder and editor of the Summerside Pioneer, at one time boarded at Joe Hyde’s and attended school at Meadow Bank.

img_5568-2

Wharf at Gordon MacLean’s shore once used by him to ship potatoes. Marked with an “x” is the Clyde River Pioneer Cemetery where Mr. MacLean, the immigrant, is buried.

Read Full Post »

This is the eighth excerpt form Meadow Bank W.I. Tweedsmuir History published in 1951. There are multiple family names referenced in this piece. We only highlighted a few in the title.

Click on map to enlarge

On the next farm lived the MacLeods who came out from Scotland about 1830. In this family were three sons: Alexander, Murdock and John and two daughters: Margaret, spinster; and Mrs. Robert MacMillan of Millvale. Since the death of Murdock, the farm has been owned in turn by Will Henderson, Cecil Scott, Wilfred MacLeod, Mr. Kennedy and now (1951) by John Miller who in 1928 emigrated with his wife and family of seven boys from West Calder, Scotland.

Of the farm that Norman MacFadyen now owns the first we know is that a Captain MacDonald owned it in 1840. (Captain Gore’s deed to Andrew Cody of farm to the west) then Duncan Patterson. His two sons, Duncan and Charles lived here, the former operated the farm while the latter had a blacksmith forge on the roadside. Wallace Patterson is a grandson of Duncan Senior and is now a jeweller in Charlottetown (1951). The Pattersons sold to Bob MacMillan who later sold to Neil Ferguson from when the present owner bought.

Continuing west we find that in 1840 one Captain Gore sold to Andrew Coady 100 acres for £116, 13d. He was married to Rosie McAtter, their three children were Mary Ann, Ellen and Andrew II. It was sold to Robert Boyle May 4th, 1896. In August 23rd, it was deeded to George H. Boyle, son of Robert. The farm is now owned by Gordon Boyle.

On the South side of the road some distance West of what is now called Boyle’s Creek, on a small corner of the Coady farm, lived Matthew Boylan, labourer, and his wife Mary McAtter, sister of the aforesaid Mrs. Coady. Their two sons were Patrick and Terrance, the former was a plasterer in Charlottetown, the latter moved to the Western part of the Island.

William Boyle & Ellen Farquharson

The next farm originally Capt. Gore’s Property was owned by John Boyle who for a time lived with his family at Cornwall on or near the farm now (1951) owned by Leigh Good. In John Boyle’s family were Michael and William and two daughters, Mrs. Angus MacEachern and Mrs. James MacLean. William moved to Charlottetown and operated a tannery on Spring Park Road. Michael continued to live on the old farm where he married Miss Margaret Boyle To this union were born four sons and five daughters. One son, the late William was the subsequent owner until his death in 1928 when the property was purchased by Fred Hyde of the adjoining farm for his son Stanley, the present owner.

“Edgewood”, the farm of Elmer Hyde consists of 125 acres and was purchased from George MacEachern, son of Angus, by Henry Hyde and willed to his son Frederick in 1896. The Hydes had to clear the land where the buildings now stand, the only building on the place at the time of their occupancy being the former Meadow Bank school house and now used as a workshop.

The remaining 75 acres of the MacEachern farm which contained the MacEachern dwellings was later sold to Frank Boyle, the present owner.

The Atlas of 1880 shows James MacLean to be in possession of the next 200 acres but this was soon after divided and Hammond Crosby bought the half next to the road and occupied it until his death in 1919 when it was bought by James MacPhail. It is now owned and occupied by his son Colin D. MacPhail (1951).

The remaining part of the original MacLean home has continued in the name passing from father to son. It is now in possession of Frank MacLean.

Of the adjoining farm, Mrs. Victor MacPhail writes,

“The first trace we have of our farm is that it was leased by the trustees of the Rt. Hon. Thomas Earl of Selkirk to one John Calladow in May 1825. This lease was assigned by John Calladow in August 1827 to Donald MacNeill. Donald MacNeill died in February 1848. He willed the lease to his wife Margaret and his two sons, Ewen and Neil. The MacNeills sold to Alexander MacLeod for the same of £250 in the year 1856. The holders of a lease had to pay rent and perform certain covenants. There is no mention of Alexander MacLeod. The next deed we have is one where James MacMillan paid the sum of $195.04 to the Commissioner of Public Lands for the said 84 acres in the year 1893. In March 1900, James MacMillan sold to Edwin Jones. Edwin Jones died and his widow sold to James MacPhail in 1908. The farm must have been resurveyed at this time for here it is listed as 80 4/5 acres. James MacPhail sold 10 acres of this to Frank Boyle. In 1936, Victor MacPhail (son) bought the remaining 70 4/5 acres. The first house was down near the shore.”

 

Read Full Post »

This is our sixth excerpt of the Meadow Bank W.I. Tweedsmuir History published in 1951.

Of the early history of what is now Meadow Bank before the British took possession of the Island then known as St. John, nothing seems to have been recorded and little seems to be known. There are evidences, however, of certain parts of it having been occupied by the French and Natives, some crude cooking utensils and tools later being discovered nearby some of the old cellars or where a large quantity of ashes in the soil told of someone having lived there before. On the farm now occupied by Robert Jewell (part of the old Hyde farm) there is the remains of an old French fortress. Two round iron cannon balls have also been found on this farm. Whether fired from a cannon or carried there is a matter of conjecture. Now in possession of Ray Crosby is an ox shoe found on his farm and a sword and bayonet supposed to have been brought here by his ancestors, also a flint and iron for kindling in those early days long before Lucifer matches were ever heard of. In 1926, the school boys of Meadow Bank found the remains of eight or ten flint-lock muskets beside a spring on the back of Ivan Clow’s farm (the old Samuel Hyde farm). It is supposed that the muskets were hidden there by the French about the time the British took possession of the Island in 1758.

The Crosbys

John Crosby, grandson of immigrant

In searching early records for authentic data, I have found it difficult to secure the exact date when the first British subject settled in Meadow Bank. The earliest we can find is of William Crosby who came from the Town of Newry, County Down, Ireland, about 1770 and three years later married Margaret Orr who died in 1824. To these were born six daughters and two sons. The sons were John, in 1775, who was the first child born of British parents in what was then known as Elliot or West River settlement and William, the younger son born in 1784. It was not till the year 1786 that Mr. Crosby, the immigrant, purchased his farm of 203 acres outright from Gov. William Patterson for the sum of £113, 12s. 3d. stirling.

Click on map to enlarge

This land, after William Crosby’s death in 1815, was divided between his two sons. John took the western half and paid William £10 for certain advantages that went with the farm. Both these men married Miss Clarks (sisters). John’s family consisted of seven sons, four remained in this vicinity purchasing more land adjoining the original farm. One of these Theophilus D. (the writer’s grandfather) lived on the farm now owned by Ray Crosby. James, Mrs. Henry Drake’s father, owned the farm now occupied by Wilbert Drake. John was unmarried. He owned the property now in possession of Fred MacGregor, the other settled in Freetown.

North River Bridge, 1894 - Public Archives photo

North River Bridge

 

William who got the eastern 150 acres of the original Crosby farm had the contract of building the first North River Bridge for the sum of £900 or, it is said, £1 per foot. He had a family of three sons and three daughters. One son, John, later became owner of the home farm while Ewen and Andre moved to Bonshaw where they bought considerable land and also founded Bonshaw Mills, later owned by Hon. Cyrus Crosby and Heath Crosby, sons of Andrew.

John married a Miss MacEwen and to this union were born two sons, James, who died while a young man studying medicine, Isaac, father of W.W. Crosby, and one daughter Elizabeth who continued to live with W.W. Crosby on the old farm which is now owned by his son, John W. As may be seen there have been six

Marie & Jack, great grandchildren of John

Marie & Jack, great-grandchildren of John

generations of Crosbys who have occupied the same land. The daughters all married farmers, Margaret, George Clark of Clark’s Mills, Wilmot; Hannah, John MacEwen of Long Creek; and Mary Elinor, T.D. Crosby, father of Pope Crosby who in turn passed his farm on to his son W. Ray.

Editor’s Notes:

  • More details on history of North River Bridge here.
  • Hyde & Crosby Pioneer Cemetery, click here.

“The Pioneers” will continue in the next excerpt – Hydes

Read Full Post »

Here is our fifth excerpt from the Meadow Bank W.I. Tweedsmuir History published in 1951.

Cornwall Hall – (photo from Arthur Howard – appeared in Cornwall History)

Cornwall Hall

The public hall at Cornwall was incorporated by an Act of Parliament in May 1897. Directors at that time were Clarence Brown, William Leonard, Pope Crosby, W.W. Crosby and Allan MacLean. The last three named were residents of Meadow Bank. The hall was first built on the North side of the Ferry Road just west of the mill stream and alongside of the cheese factory. In 1915, it was moved to its present site. (as of 1951)

The Women’s Institute of Cornwall-York Point and Meadow Bank keep this hall in repair and equip it with necessary facilities. In 1950, with a view to adding a kitchen, we catered for four days at the Provincial Exhibition grounds during Old Home Week and made a net profit of over $1700.

Libraries

As early as 1898 we have records of a Sunday School Library at Cornwall with George H. Boyle as librarian. On May 5th of that year, Russell Hyde attended Sunday school and obtained a book.

A library was placed in Meadow Bank School in 1930, largely through the efforts of Miss Vera Hyde who was then the teacher and presented a school concert in Cornwall Hall to raise funds for a suitable book case. The selection and presentation of books was made by the Carnegie Library Foundation. Books have been added from time to time by the Women’s Institute and others.

Editor’s Notes:

  • To learn more about Cornwall Hall and other civic buildings, refer to the Cornwall History here.
  • On the Hall photo that you see featured, that property later became the site of the post office and later a dental clinic. The new post office is now located in the open field that you see in the foreground of the photo.
  • Cornwall now has a library in their new Town Hall, more information here.

Stay tuned for the next excerpt where we will read about Meadow Bank pioneers.

Read Full Post »

Here is our fourth excerpt from The Meadow Bank W.I. Tweedsmuir History in 1951 written by Mrs. Charles Hyde.

Cornwall Methodist Church 1855-1902 – Photo from Lawson Drake

The people of early Meadow Bank were for the most part Protestants and divine worship was held in some of the houses in winter and barns in summer. At a quarterly meeting held in the Mission House in the city of Charlottetown August 1818, the following question was asked, “What measures shall we adopt for the prosperity of the work of God?” to which was given the following answer to which dates the beginning of Methodistism in this part of the country. “That there be preaching, exhortation or prayer meeting at Little York and West River services held in the house of William Crosby in the winter and in the summer his barn be used.” The first preacher was Mr. Chappelle. Services were continued until some years later a lot was secured at Cornwall and a log building erected which served the people until 1955 when a large frame building was built. This stood until April 1902 when it was torn down to give place to the present church (as of 1951).

img_5558-2

Church built in 1901

The land where the Cornwall Church now stands was obtained through a Government Grant for a Church of England. As there were no English church people here the Methodists obtained it. Smith Bros. built the first church. The first minister there was Rev. Robert Strong with first sexton, Mrs. John Corbin. Mr. Zachariah Mayhew presented the tunes as in those days there was no organ or choir.

In the present church is a panel window on the south side in memory of Mary Ellen Crosby (January 7, 1824 – August 2, 1901) wife of Mr. Theophilus Crosby.

John Crosby was one of the first residents of Meadow Bank to use a driving wagon to convey his family to church. This was in the year 1878.

The first Meadow Bank resident to use an automobile to travel to church at Cornwall was Mr. Frederick Hyde.

The nearest buying ground was one in Charlottetown belonging to the Church of England. It is supposed that the earliest settlers were buried there for we know that upon one occasion when a death occurred during a stormy time in winter the trip to Charlottetown could not be made for over a week. Due to this inconvenient state of affairs, land for a burying ground was donated by Messrs. Hyde and Crosby. Although a cemetery was later started at Cornwall, this plot continues to be the burial place of Hydes and Crosbys.

Editor’s notes:

  • To view photos and read more history on the church in Cornwall, click here.
  • To view current photos and learn more about the West River United Church website, click here.

Read Full Post »

Here is our third excerpt from Meadow Bank Women’s Institute Tweedsmuir History – published in 1951.

School instruction started around at houses in about the same way as church services were held. The principal courses on the curriculum being the three “R’s”. Tradition says that upon one occasion when a barn then on the property now owned by J.W. Crosby was used for a school, disobedient pupils were made to kneel and do penance on the cobble stones beside the barn.

img_5410-2

Meadow Bank School – received “Honourable Mention” in the School Beautification Contest in 1950

As far as we know, the first schoolhouse was built about 1830, for we find in the Campbell’s History that in that year there were on the Island three grammar school teachers, seventy-one district teachers and six Acadian teachers. The first school inspector received appointment in 1837.

The first teacher we know of in Meadow Bank was a Mr. McCarval. It was then customary for each family to take a turn at keeping the teacher who got their board in return for extra help given to pupils at home. The present school was built in 1877. The last teacher in the old school (which is now Mr. Fred Hyde’s workshop) was Miss Furness. The first teacher in the new school was Miss Bessie Gill.

IMG_5413 2.jpg

Meadow Bank School District – Meacham’s 1880 Atlas (Click on the map to enlarge)

Serving as school secretaries have been Mr. Hammond Crosby, Mr. Samuel Drake, Mr. George Boyle. The present secretary is Mr. Stanley Hyde with Mr. Robert Jewell, Mr. Stewart Drake and Mr. Victor MacPhail on the Trustee Board (1950-51).

In the minutes of the school meeting of 1897 with William Boyle as chairman and Samuel Drake, secretary, we find the sum of $30 voted for expenses and $25 for teacher’s supplement. The janitor’s pay was $6.75. Compared with this, in 1951, the teacher’s supplement is $275 and the janitor’s pay is $80.

Wood was used for fuel until 1905 when the first coal stove was purchased.

In conversation with the oldest living residents, we find that at one time, mid-week prayer meetings were held in the school, led by Mr. William Boyle. For a time, a singing school was conducted by a blind teacher, Miss Porter, who boarded at the residence of Samuel Hyde.

Since 1947, the Meadow Bank branch of Cornwall Mission Band began meeting monthly in the school with Mrs. Colin Murray. Mrs. Charles Hyde and Mrs. Sterling Clow in turn serving as leaders assisted by different women of the district.

School Organ

When Jessie MacKay was teaching in Meadow Bank, she and her pupils staged a concert in Cornwall Hall. The money earned ($25) was used to buy an organ which was originally owned by Harriet (Hyde) Howard. The organ was used for Christmas concerts, Mission Band and Sunday school meetings. The organ and other articles from the school may still be seen at Jewell’s Country Gardens.

Class of 1913: 

img_5570-2

Teacher: Jack Heartz  Students: Charlie Hyde, Hazel MacLean, Lottie Crosby, Charlotte Drake, Winnie MacLean, Myrtle Crosby, Marie Crosby, Lillian Hyde, Dan MacLean, Dick Drake, Cora MacLean, Helen Crosby, Ethel & Tillie Boyle, Anita Hyde, Vera Hyde, Laura Crosby.

Class of 1917: (no listing of names)

img_5569-2

screen-shot-2017-01-29-at-6-08-07-pm

Class of 1927 (click on photo to enlarge)

Class of 1927 (Our contribution to this story: photo gathered during Clyde River Capturing Collective Memories Project – McLean collection)

Back row: Ethel (Ling) MacPhail (teacher), Percy Boyle, Jack Crosby

Centre row: Elmer Hyde, Stewart Drake, Reigh, Ruby, Helen Scott, Freddie Scott, Hazel Boyle, Hazel MacLean, Jean MacLean, Louis MacLean (standing on own to right)

Front Row: Vernon Drake, Lulu Scott, Lloyd Scott, Louise S., Jean Boyle, Harvey MacLean, Dorothy Mac L.

img_5408-2

Class of 1950 (click on photo to enlarge)

Class of 1950:

Back Row: Teacher Doris (Miller) Clow Students: David MacPhail, Ruth MacPhail, Miriam yde, Blois MacPhail, Douglas Hyde, Heath MacPhail, Garth Scott

Front Row: Jean MacPhail, Vivian Drake, Eleanor Hyde, Verna MacPhail, Avard Clow, Beverley Jewell, Russel Drake, Wendall Hyde, Byron Clow.

screen-shot-2017-01-29-at-6-41-25-pm

Class of 1952 or 53 (click on photo to enlarge)

Class of 1952 or 53: photo gathered during Clyde River Capturing Collective Memories Project – McLean collection

Back row: David MacPhail, Garth Scott, Ernest Mutch (Teacher), Miriam Hyde (Lank), Ruth MacPhail (Roggeveen), Beverley Jewell (Gillespie)

Centre Row: Eleanor Hyde (Morrison), Verna MacPhail (Clow), Wendell Hyde, Byron Clow, Jean MacPhail

Front Row: Wilma Hyde (Newson), Sharon MacLean, Doris Hyde, David Yeo

Editor’s notes:

If a family owned property in a community, they had the option to send their children to that community’s school. My mother (Hazel MacLean) Beer lived on a farm where the border of Clyde River and Meadow Bank crossed through their farm. She, her older sister Jean and their younger brother Louis went to school in Meadow Bank in the early years, as you see in the 1927 photo above. They would walk through the forest as a short cut to Meadow Bank School, but then they found there were more car rides heading to Clyde River and their close cousins lived there, so they began going to Clyde River School. The bonus in winter was crossing the ice at Clyde River which made it a short trip to school. They would go down through the fields where Lorne and Sadie MacLean live now, cross the ice and head up Murray’s field. A sled made it an even faster trip.

Watch out for our next excerpt on Meadow Bank’s History.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »