Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Rivers’ Category

Drone over Clyde RiverOur ancestors would look at us strangely if we said there was a drone flying over Clyde River taking photos, but that is what is happening. Oswald tells me that Scott Stevens has been contracted by the Golf Association of PEI to take photos via drone of the 16-member golf courses in PEI. The benefit we get is to see Clyde River and neighbouring communities from a birds eye view in all their spectacular beauty. The golf course looks great, Oswald and team.

Read Full Post »

Clyde River

Clyde River

The AGM for the Central Queens Branch of the PEI Wildlife Federation will be held on Saturday, March 21st at 10:00 a.m. at the Riverview Community Centre in Clyde River.

Learn about your community’s stream restoration projects taking place in addition to plans for the Bonshaw Hills Public Lands from BHPL subcommittee member Megan Harris.

This is a great opportunity to come out and meet your neighbours and friends and find out what’s happening in your watershed and how you can get involved. During the AGM, there will be an opportunity to renew memberships in the CQWF.

Read Full Post »

Photos and story from the “Capturing Collective Memories” Library – The following historical piece was written by Lee Darrach (1916-2000), son of Hector Alexander Darrach (1883-1971). It offers us insight on how farms along the Clyde River supplemented their income by fishing on the Clyde River and adjoining West River.

Hector Darrach Home (1)

Hector and Ina Darrach’s Farm, Clyde River Road

Hector Alexander Darrach was born on his father’s farm in Clyde River on September 8, 1883. (editor’s note: his father’s farm is currently owned by Sidney Poritz.) His great grandfather, Duncan Darrach emigrated from Scotland to this country and is buried in the Pioneer Cemetery, St. Catherines. His father, John Darrach and his grandfather, also called John, are buried in the Clyde River Presbyterian Church Cemetery.

The John Darrach Family

There were eleven children in this family: Florence Catherine, John Duncan, Neil Archibald, Frances Catherine, Daniel John, Lee Grant, Hector Alexander, Angus Fulford, Isobel Jane, Eldon J., Lillian May.

Florence married Samuel Ross, a building contractor and they settled in Dorchester, Mass. John married Beatrice MacDonald and they made their home in Quincy, Mass. Neil married Dicey MacLean and they settled on a farm in Clyde River. Frances married Frederick Beer and they made their home on the Bannockburn Road. Daniel never married and moved to Western Canada and worked on the railroad. Lee married Lottie Dixon from Bannockburn Road. He was a carpenter by trade. Hector married Ina Beer from Bannockburn Road and they made their home on a farm in Clyde River. Fulford was married twice, first to Ethel MacLaughlin from Clyde River and then to Ethel Berry from Nova Scotia. Eldon married Margaret MacPhee from New Haven and they made their home in Brandon, Manitoba. Isobel and Lillian died in their infancy.

Hector Darrach attended Clyde River school and as a young man purchased an adjoining farm to his father’s farm and married Ina Mary Beer, daughter of James Beer from Bannockburn Road.

The James Beer Family

There were six children in this family: Maggie Jane, Amy Ann, Saida Elizabeth, Frederick Boyd, Ina Mary and Mamie.

Maggie married William Younker and they made their home on a farm in Kingston. Amy married a Mr. Mayhew and they farmed in Clyde River. Saida married Wesley Hood and they settled on a farm in Cornwall. Frederick married Frances Darrach from Clyde River and they made their home in Bannockburn Road. Ina married Hector Darrach and they farmed in Clyde River. Mamie died at the age of two years in 1896. 

The Hector Darrach Family

Five children were born in this family: Hector ‘Ralph’, Margaret ‘Marie’, John James, Lee Daniel, and Amy ‘Joyce’.

Ralph was twice married, first to Jean MacLeod, from Milton and Della MacLeod from Long Creek. They farmed in St. Catherines. Marie married Wilfred Stretch from Long Creek and they made their home on a farm there. John married Marguerite Crosby and they farmed in Clyde River. Lee, the author of this biography, married Eleanor MacFadyen and they made their home in West Royalty. Lee worked for the Civil Service. Joyce married Norman MacKenzie from Long Creek and they settled on a farm there. Hector built a new house on his newly-acquired land and farmed there successfully for most of his life.

FARM LIFE

Growing up on this farm in the ‘twenties’ was little different from that experienced by others on adjacent farms. The completion of farm chores was required of us siblings. Weeding and harvesting of farm crops and caring for farm animals, all required hard and often tedious work.

If drudgery was a part of farm work during the summer, the autumn and winter months of the year were a far different story. The location of our farm at the confluence of the Clyde and West Rivers gave us the opportunity to participate in three off-farm activities that were of great interest to us as well as supplementing farm income. These activities were the oyster fishery, the smelt fishery and mud digging.

OYSTER FARMING

In the autumn of each year, oyster fishing dories would arrive at our shore to begin this annual fishery. Many farm owners and farm workers as well as fishers from as far away as Charlottetown participated. The Charlottetown fishers constructed shacks and ate and slept there during the fishing season that lasted for approximately two months.

Oysters were hand raked using oyster fishing tongues from and along the channels of the Clyde and West Rivers with the greatest effort being made during the low tides. At this time upwards to one hundred dories fishing these channels so close to each other that from a distance they appeared as a long black line.

At high tide the fishers could be observed at the shore culling their catches in their dories. What a delight it was on warm autumn days to watch these fishers work on their catches, to sample these delicious shellfish and to row a dory up and down the calm waters along the shore!

I particularly remember the Biso family from Charlottetown, Thomas and his two sons Wilfred and Peter.  Although Thomas was one of the older fishers, he could rake more oysters than most others despite a permanent injury to one of his hands.

Some Friday nights my father would drive the Biso family to their home on Riley’s Lane, Charlottetown. Sitting in the back seat of the Model T Ford on that trip to Charlottetown, despite the cold, was the most interesting time of the week. Mrs. Biso would have sausage sizzling on the coal fired stove and these along with “store bought” bread provided a welcome change to our usual humble fare of “home made” bread and potatoes.

Every week Charles Earl of Earl Fisheries from Charlottetown with his helper, a Mr. MacRae, would arrive at our farm yard with their truck to buy the oyster catches which were taken up from the shore in bags. The oysters were emptied into a “measuring” barrel provided by Mr. Earl.  Mr. MacRae who was a powerfully built man would shake the barrel as the oysters were being dumped in much to the displeasure of the fishers who could see their returns for their hard week’s work diminish with each shake of the barrel.  They received ten dollars for each barrel. Experienced fishers could rake in excess of one barrel of oysters each day.

SMELT FISHERY

The fishing of smelts was carried out on the Clyde and West Rivers commencing each season as soon as the ice formed – usually about Christmas time.

Each ”enterprise” laid claim to one or two of the same “berths” year after year and their claims were usually respected by the other “enterprises”. Each “enterprise” usually consisted of one fisher, two brothers, or a father and son. The spacing between each “berth” was laid down by “regulation”.

Disputes over “berths” were not uncommon. Clayton Shaw, the fishery officer from Charlottetown, would be summoned to arbitrate between disputing parties.

Smelt fishing nets were constructed of twine with a mesh size fine enough to retain the fish and were commonly referred to as  “bag” nets. The mouth of the net when open and held in place was rectangular in shape and measured approximately twenty feet by eight feet. The bag and trap extended back from the mouth some twenty to thirty feet. The far end of the trap could be opened to allow the catch to be removed from the net.

The net was held in position in the channel of the river by two large poles each fitted with two iron slip rings and sharpened on the large end of each. Two holes were then made in the ice the width of the net apart. The top and bottom of the mouth of the nets were fastened to the slip rings, the poles placed through the holes in the ice, and firmly anchored in the mud of the riverbed. Much smaller poles called “set” poles were then fastened to the bottom slip rings thus enabling the mouth of the net to be opened and closed from the surface of the ice. A narrow opening in the ice between the two poles was made to allow the net to be placed in the water and to be hauled out of the water to remove the fish from the trap of the net.

When the net was not “set”, the mouth was held closed by fastening the bottom slip ring to the top slip ring at either end of the net. To set the net, the set pole, which was fastened to each of the bottom slip rings, was pushed downward.

The net was set at low tide by opening the mouth of the net to fish the incoming tide. The mouth was left open for three to four hours and then closed by pulling up the set poles. The net was hauled out through the narrow opening in the ice and the catch removed from the trap. The net would then be placed back in the water and would be set again on the next tide.

Catches varied from a few pounds to a few hundred pounds. At our “enterprise” which involved two “berths”, the catch would be taken by horse and sleigh to the farmyard and spread on ice until frozen. They were then graded and packed into containers for shipment to the Fulton Fish Market in New York City. Prices varied from five to ten cents per pound.

Because of the nature of tides, smelt fishing was carried on at various times of the day or night. During the nighttime, the sight of the fishers with their lanterns moving from their homes to their berths on the river to set or haul their nets was not easily forgotten.

MUSSEL MUD DIGGING

During the latter months of the winter season when the ice was at its thickest the mud digger would be hauled out over the ice to the channel of the West River. A hole would be cut in the thick ice to allow the heavy iron “fork” to be lowered to the mussel bed at the bottom of the channel. By means of a capstan and cable, the fork with its load of mud would be raised to the surface of the ice and deposited into a waiting wood sleigh. Power to the capstan was supplied by horsepower. It was so interesting to watch the horse as he circled the capstan, cutting into the ice with his iron clad shoes making a circular path that became ever deeper as the work progressed.

The mud was transported by horse and sleigh to local farms as well as to farms miles away.

The bounty from the river provided provender to our household. The clam and oyster chowders and the pan-fried smelts made many delicious meals. Waterfowl were abundant during the autumn months on these rivers and creeks. These waterfowl afforded recreation as well as meat for the table. It is somewhat ironic that in our affluent society these foods, which were free for the taking, are now considered a luxury not affordable by people of average income.

Looking back over the years the memories of growing up on the Darrach farm are fading now but things will never be the same.  It is very unlikely that oyster and smelt fishing and mud digging will ever again be carried out on these rivers. But fond memories of these farm activities will still remain.

Many years have now passed and upon reflection I think the poet John Bannister Tabb expresses my feelings best in his poem entitled “Childhood”.

Childhood

Old Sorrow, I shall meet again,
And Joy, perchance – but never, never,
Happy Childhood, shall we twain
See each other’s face forever!

And yet I would not call thee back
Dear Childhood, lest the sight of me,
Thine old companion, on the rack
Of Age, should sadden even thee.

– John Bannister Tabb (1845-1909)

Jon Darrach Collection 108

Aerial view of Hector and Ina Darrach’s farm – house and buildings are no longer there.

 

Read Full Post »

Clyde River

Clyde River

The West River Watershed Group under the Central Queens Wildlife Federation is looking to expand its management plan to include Clyde River and other sub-watersheds and they are looking for community input.

We invite you to join the discussion on four evenings at the Riverview Community Centre:

  • Tuesday, February 11th, 7:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday, February 25th, 7:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, March 13th, 7:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, March 27th, 7:00 p.m.

The extent of your involvement would be to share your knowledge and offer input at the meetings which will be valuable in the development of the Clyde River Sub-watershed Plan. Ideally, it would be great to have a good geographic representation across the community. For more information, please contact Megan Harris at cqwf.pei@gmail.com

Read Full Post »

Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 4.06.12 PMThe West River Watershed Group is pleased to welcome Clyde River native, Rebecca Gass, to the Board of Directors to represent and liaise with the Clyde River community on work being done within the Clyde River. Rebecca comes to the Board after studying at Mount Saint Vincent University, graduating in 2011 with a Bachelor of Public Relations. She currently works at the University of Prince Edward Island in the Department of Integrated Communications and brings with her an expertise in communications and event management. In her spare time, Rebecca enjoys practicing yoga, travelling, hiking, snowshoeing and spending time with her family and friends.

“I was so fortunate to be able to grow up in a beautiful community like Clyde River,” says Gass. “I’m so pleased to represent and contribute to the community I love in this way.”

Read Full Post »

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 12.38.39 PMIn between Winter weather warnings and following a little touch of Spring in Winter, we can think of what activities we would like to take in. The Clyde River Lecture Series last year was popular and many people were asking if it could be continued. The Friends of Clyde River group extended invitations and we have three speakers confirmed for February. We hope for good travelling. Make sure to mark your calendars and plan to attend. Invite your friends and family from other communities as well. The lectures will take place at the Riverview Community Centre.

This year, we are spreading the lectures out over the year, so here are the three that will launch the 2014 series. I think they will be well worth getting bundled up for and heading out to learn, meet friends and enjoy a hot cup of tea or coffee.

Saturday, February 8th, 1:30-3:00 p.m. – Dr. Lawson Drake – Rare Words and Old Readers – Changes in Farming

Lawson Drake was educated at Prince of Wales College, MacDonald College, Cornell University and Dalhousie University. He taught biology and agriculture at Prince of Wales College and is now retired from UPEI where he taught biology. He served as the first Chair of the UPEI Biology Department and was its third Dean of Science. He is a native of Meadow Bank where he lives with his wife Eileen in a house built by his grandfather in 1881 on a farm that has been in the Drake name since 1852.

In his lecture, he will lead an interactive presentation “Rare Words and Old Readers” where he will highlight changes in farming during his lifetime and from earlier times. For example, he might ask you, “If someone gave you a firkin, could you eat it, spend it, put it in the bank, give it to someone else, fill it or plant it? His talk will no doubt stimulate some interesting discussions about farming.

Saturday, February 15th, 1:30-3:00 p.m. – Judy Shaw – Renovating the Shaw Family Homestead, St. Catherine’s

Judy is the granddaughter of Walter Shaw, former premier of PEI from 1959-66, and is now living in the family homestead in St. Catherine’s where she had spent summer vacations with her grandparents. She is the daughter of Bud and Ethel Shaw who live in Oshawa, Ontario. Judy is retired but is working as a consultant. She is a graduate of University of Guelph and worked for 34 years in regulatory affairs, government relations and public affairs with Syngenta and its legacy companies (Novartis and Ciba-Geigy), that included six years at Syngenta’s Global Head Office in Basel, Switzerland, on the product development team. Judy’s passion for agriculture led to a philanthropic giving back program focused on agricultural leadership in Canada as well as sustainable agriculture and hunger issues; enrolment with Imagine Canada; and a leadership development program for grower association board members to enhance their effectiveness as advocates for agriculture. Judy is currently the President of the Canadian Agriculture Hall of Fame and Director with Genomics Atlantic and, among many other previous roles, she has been President of the Canadian 4-H Council.

Judy will speak about coming back to live in the Shaw family homestead that her grandparents built and managing renovations over this past year. The home is a modified Cape Cod style similar to homes built in the 1860s and particularly to a home that her grandmother lived in while she was nursing in Boston. The home was built in 1923 on a farm settled by the Shaw’s in 1808. Judy will speak about the interesting things she found during the renovation, what is unique about renovating an old family home and gardens of a place with so many memories, what to consider, what to keep and what to change. She will bring along some old photos as well as some before and after shots.

Saturday, February 22nd, 1:30-3:00 p.m. – Jack Sorensen, Tryon & Area Historical Society – Capturing the History of a Community for Generations 

Jack Sorensen is a retired Electronics instructor from Holland College who is now dedicated to developing a vintage radio collection, researching and interpreting local history and being active in church, cemetery and watershed activities. He chairs the Tryon and Area Historical Society, Archives Committee at South Shore United Church and Tryon Peoples’ Cemetery.

Jack will speak about the growth of their Historical Society and how it contributes to community spirit. Their activities include walks, talks, concerts, interviews with area seniors, establishing collections of historical artefacts and materials, developing interpretative trails and carrying out school heritage projects. Jack’s presentation will offer us a wonderful example of what another country community has achieved in capturing and celebrating their area’s history. Of particular interest will be how they actively support intergenerational events and projects where young people and seniors come together. Young people enjoy hearing old stories, and technology can be a great way of making history available in a way that interests them.

Lectures run from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. and are followed by coffee/tea and homemade treats. If you have any questions about the lectures, please contact Vivian at vivian@eastlink.ca.

Read Full Post »

Screen Shot 2014-01-19 at 1.00.34 PM

Doreen Pound

Doreen Beer Pound, a lifelong resident of Clyde River, has expressed an interest in recapturing some of Clyde River’s past in watercolour and pen. She is accepting submissions of photographs of homes, barns, businesses, buildings, items, or scenes depicting early times in Clyde River and area.  If you or someone you know has a photo(s) that you feel would be of interest and might be suitable, please contact Doreen at doreenpound@gmail.com or at 902-675-2466.

Each submission should include some background information, i.e., location, when it was built, by whom, who lived/worked there, type of business with brief description. If it is a photo of an item, explain what it is and what is was used for. She will select from the photos and create art featuring watercolour and pen that will be displayed at a public showing later this year at the Riverview Community Centre. Doreen’s work will be her contribution towards the Prince Edward Island’s 2014 celebrations. It is her wish that our community’s history be recorded not only in word but also through art. Preferably she would like a good quality COPY of original photos that do not need to be returned.

Doreen has been painting in both watercolour and acrylics but prefers working with watercolours and pen where she has developed a style she particularly enjoys. She credits Julia Purcell, well-known local artist, with introducing her to the fascinating world of sketching and intricacies and magic of watercolours at LEAP, Learning Elders Art Program, held in our community for a number of years along with PEI Seniors College. She has also studied under Henry Purdy, Mary Curtis, Geraldine Ysselstein, Susan Christensen and Anne Gallant, all well-known and respected Island artists.

Here are some samples of heritage photos and her pen and watercolour interpretations:

Screen Shot 2014-01-19 at 12.58.58 PM

Dunedin photo

Screen Shot 2014-01-19 at 1.00.06 PM

pen drawing

Screen Shot 2014-01-19 at 2.55.04 PM

Crossing the river

Screen Shot 2014-01-19 at 12.59.41 PM

Watercolour and pen

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »